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National Conference on Education for the Ceramic Arts

By Zoë Wyner

NCECA-installation-(1)

NCECA 2015 Biennial installation at the Bell Gallery of Brown University in Providence, RI.

 

Every year, thousands of potters convene for the National Conference on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA), meeting in a different location each time. This year, the conference was held in New England for the first time in over 3 decades. I decided to go to the conference to further my knowledge of clay arts, both for personal growth and also to provide Gateway with additional methods, contacts, and resources.

NCECA was held at Rhode Island’s Convention Center in Providence, an enormous multi-storied building with numerous meeting rooms and ballrooms. During the conference, each of these rooms housed many demonstrations, discussions, and lectures. One of the ballrooms was exclusively dedicated to booths where schools and other organizations focused on clay could promote the work of their artists as well as connect with one another. The demos and lectures throughout the conference were on a range of topics, from the importance of ceramic arts in a psychiatric hospital to new techniques in glazing and inlay.

One of my goals as the manager of Studio A is to provide the artists with additional opportunities in the creation of 3D works of art. Since I took on this position, I have noticed that there is a good deal of interest in and demand for more supports and accessibility 3D mediums from numerous artists. Going to NCECA gave me a number of new ideas and approaches to bringing these art forms to Studio A. In terms of clay specifically, there is only so much that can be done in Studio A as we do not have the proper ventilation to work with clay in the studio itself. However, I learned new glaze techniques which the artists can apply to premade pieces. I learned new sculptural techniques which I can pass onto those interested. Also, by furthering my knowledge as a potter, I can better provide artists with new forms to decorate, and work on designing pieces that are conducive to their styles as artists

Read the full article by Zoë here: NCECA Article

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